Accessibility Checklist

Web Content

  1. A text equivalent for every non-text element shall be provided via "alt" (alternative text attribute), "longdesc" (long description tag), or in element content.
  2. Web pages shall be designed so that all information required for navigation or meaning is not dependent on the ability to identify specific colors.
  3. Changes in the natural language (e.g., English to French) of a document's text and any text equivalents shall be clearly identified.
  4. Documents shall be organized so they are readable without requiring an associated style sheet.
  5. Web pages shall update equivalents for dynamic content whenever the dynamic content changes.
  6. Redundant text links shall be provided for each active region of a server-side image map.
  7. Client-side image maps shall be used whenever possible in place of server-side image maps.
  8. Data tables shall provide identification of row and column headers.
  9. Markup shall be used to associate data cells and header cells for data tables that have two or more logical levels of row or column headers.
  10. Frames shall be titled with text that facilitates frame identification and navigation.
  11. Pages shall be usable when scripts, applets, or other programmatic objects are turned off or are not supported, or shall provide equivalent information on an alternative accessible page.
  12. Equivalent alternatives for any multimedia presentation shall be synchronized with the presentation.
  13. An appropriate method shall be used to facilitate the easy tracking of page content that provides users of assistive technology the option to skip repetitive navigation links.
  14. Background colors will be avoided since color schemes can create problems with legibility.
  15. Multiple browser testing will be conducted on the current versions of Netscape Navigator, Internet Explorer and Lynx.
  16. The Official Web Site of the State of Rhode Island will provide a link to a text version of the Web site.
  17. The Official Web Site of the State of Rhode Island will have descriptive, intuitive text links and avoid the use of vague references such as "click," "here," "link," or "this."

In addition to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, the portal recognizes Section 508 standards are more specific in specific areas:

Design Considerations

The following list has been compiled from various sources. The purpose of this list is to provide a summary of the types of issues to consider when creating and designing accessible HTML pages.

Universal Design

Text-Based Design

Graphics and Images

Audio/Visual Features

Additional References

The following are provided as references for Universal Web site Accessibility issues.

The Law

Universal Accessibility

Designing Accessible HTML Pages

Alternative Access Systems

Disability-Related Information

Revised 03/25/2005